Aug
29
6:30 PM18:30

DUBBO


The End Of The World As We Know It?

If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? This philosophical puzzle is front of mind for geographer Dale Dominey-Howes as he examines how people process natural disasters. Does it still constitute a ‘disaster’ if it occurs in an unpopulated area and no one is affected? In answering this question, Dale will explore the difference between hazards and disasters and uncover the most catastrophic natural tragedies of all time. He will also dissect the inextricable link between climate change and natural disasters and discuss what's in store for our planet.

Bio

Meet geography extraordinaire, Dale Dominey-Howes, expert in all things disastrous and hazardous and with an interest in society and environment interactions, coastal processes, One Health and climate change. Dale has done extensive work globally on natural hazards such as earthquakes, river floods, tropical cyclones, tsunami, volcanic eruptions and bushfires. He also consults in organisations such as the United Nations, The World Bank, the State and Federal government and is currently the Chairman of the United Nations UNESCO-IOC Post-disaster Policy and Protocols Working Group.

 

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Aug
29
7:30 PM19:30

DUBBO


How To Convince Your Boss That You Deserve To Sleep In

Night owls, rejoice! Workplace researcher Stefan Volk has compelling evidence suggesting that it is scientifically beneficial to press snooze on your alarm clock. His findings show that a person’s body clock can have a significant impact on work performance. In his talk, he will demonstrate how modern life is actually geared towards morning people, as circadian rhythms can have an effect on workplace safety and teamwork capacity, and why we all deserve a sleep in.

Bio

Stefan Volk explores new areas of scientific inquiry that lie dormant between established disciplines of organisational studies and neuroscience. His innovative approach to workplace neuroscience has seen him published in prestigious academic journals and making frequent appearances in the news.

 

 
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Raising the Bar in Dubbo & Orange

The University of Sydney School of Rural Health Dubbo and Orange is part of Australia’s oldest university that has supported big ideas for more than 160 years. Our founders recognised the power of education and new ideas to change our world for the better. We hold that belief just as strongly today..

 
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Aug
22
7:00 PM19:00

ORANGE

Planetary Health: What is it and does it matter?

Remarkable advances in human health through new vaccines, drug treatments and surgical procedures have been made in recent decades, but at a cost to our planet. To achieve these health gains, natural systems have been exploited at an unprecedented scale. Pollution, biodiversity loss and climate change are affecting the health of our rivers, oceans and ecosystems. Join Tony as he canvasses the relationships between the health of the natural world and the health of people. It’s not all bad news of course because solutions do lie within reach, we just need to embrace new possibilities.

Bio

Tony Capon, the world’s first professor of planetary health knows a thing or two about health and wellbeing in the changing environment. Born on a farm in Otago, New Zealand, and originally trained as a medical doctor in Queensland, his research on the links between the environment and human health has taken him from scooping dog poo off suburban streets in Brisbane, to re-thinking slum health in Africa and South Asia.

 
 
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Aug
22
6:00 PM18:00

ORANGE


The End Of The World As We Know It?

If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? This philosophical puzzle is front of mind for geographer Dale Dominey-Howes as he examines how people process natural disasters. Does it still constitute a ‘disaster’ if it occurs in an unpopulated area and no one is affected? In answering this question, Dale will explore the difference between hazards and disasters and uncover the most catastrophic natural tragedies of all time. He will also dissect the inextricable link between climate change and natural disasters and discuss what's in store for our planet.

Bio

Meet geography extraordinaire, Dale Dominey-Howes, expert in all things disastrous and hazardous and with an interest in society and environment interactions, coastal processes, One Health and climate change. Dale has done extensive work globally on natural hazards such as earthquakes, river floods, tropical cyclones, tsunami, volcanic eruptions and bushfires. He also consults in organisations such as the United Nations, The World Bank, the State and Federal government and is currently the Chairman of the United Nations UNESCO-IOC Post-disaster Policy and Protocols Working Group.

Also speaking at this location at 7:00pm is Tony Capon

 

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