Top 10 Australian Podcasts

Just as any vehicle relies on a well-oiled engine to thrive, a daily dose of inspiration is critical to keeping our passion and hustle strong. For many of us, finding motivation can become a neglected priority and carving out the time in our busy schedules to learn something new continues to be a challenge. We fail to recognise that inspiration comes in a variety of shapes, sizes and sounds.

Outside of the museum visits and reading lists, simply investing a couple of moments every day to renew your sense of purpose can make a world of difference in our productivity, enthusiasm and well-being. Whether you need some easy listening to wind down or an inspiring talk to get your brain cells, here are our the top 10 podcasts from Raising The Bar Talks around the country:

1.

Bad Blood- Women, Danger and Popular music

By Rebecca Sheehan

From Beyonce to Ariana Grande, female artists are the biggest selling in the world, yet the realm of popular music undermines their power by focusing on feuds between women, exploiting female desire and indulging male power. In this podcast, hear from Rebecca Sheehan about the ways in which women can navigate the pleasures and dangers of popular music and create new social norms.

10.png

2.

Quantum physics rules everything around me (and you)

By Michael Biercuk

It may be hard to fathom but the realm of quantum physics facilities every part of our daily life. Technology such as smartphones, internet services and GPS services only scratch the surface of the potential of quantum physics if we were to exploit the full richness of the field. Tune in to hear Associate Professor Michael J. Biercuk as he unpacks quantum-enhanced technology and its influence on the way our societies are organised.

7.png

3.

Humour:

It's funny how it helps you learn

By Kate Offer

Specialising in Thoughts and Evidence at the University of Western Australia’s law school, Dr Kate Offer shares the invaluable contribution of humour in storytelling, teaching and communication. Whether it’s slapstick, a hint of sarcasm or a good old pun, Dr Kate Offer reveals how different types of humour act as a powerful social tool to improve promote cohesion and improve learning environments. Have a laugh with Dr Kate Offer here.

11.png

4.Does evil exist?

By Luke Russell

After hearing news of spree killings and other atrocities, it can be tempting to explain devastating happenings as an act of someone ‘evil’. But is this the right conclusion? Philosopher Luke Russel challenges our notions of the reality of evil, our acceptance of evil and whether ‘evil’ is a supernatural force or merely a label to condemn the vicious people? Hear the talk here.

2.png

5.It's Only Natural, discovering the ecology of cities

By Dieter Hochuli

When we think of ‘cities’, we think of concrete jungles and bustling streets. But, surprisingly, there’s a number of animals and plants that share our cities with us. By 2050, it’s predicted that up to 80 per cent of humans will live in an urban area so it’s vital that we learn how to live in an ecosystem that can flourish. In this talk, hear Associate Professor Dieter Hochulin discuss how nature can adapt to city life and why living with nature is better for us all.

6.png

6.Beware Your Actions As They Become Your Habits

By Troye Wallett

If you’re one of many people that love to start a new years resolution but struggle to see lasting results, Dr Troye Wallet’s talk is for you. According to the Aged Care GP and co-founder of ethics-based medical practice, GenWise, Dr Troye Wallet walks us through why he thinks outcomes-based goals are ‘rubbish’. You’re better off starting again with process-based goals that will get you over the line. Hear more from Dr Troye Wallett’s talk from Adelaide here.

9.png

7.Making Darkness Visible

By Alan Duffy

For half a decade, astronomers have realised the existence of an invisible mass, outweighing all of the atoms, planets and people in the universe five times over. This invisible mass is responsible for making the galaxies form together, yet astronomers are yet to uncover its nature. Fancy yourself a space junkie? Feel small again as Alan Duffy unpacks how Australia’s most powerful telescopes may be the key to making this invisible darkness, visible. Listen now.

8.Beauty and the Beast: Indigenous Beauty Decolonised

By Sasha Sarago & Nayuka Gorrie

Every day, Indigenous women in Australia are confronted with demoralising statements such as ‘you’re too pretty to be Aboriginal’. In this talk, a former Indigenous model, Sasha Sarago, and freelance writer, Nayuka Gorrie, explore the objectification of Indigenous beauty in Australia’s colonial history. Hear how beauty is viewed by Indigenous women and join a global movement that reclaims the inherent beauty of Indigenous values and traditions.

Untitled design.png

9.Next time you see a person who is homeless…

By Lisa Wood

As a tireless advocate of dignity and public support for people who are homeless, Dr Lisa Wood talks about three decades of public health research and teaching that has helped her understand why there are certain assumptions and stereotypes of homeless people. With almost seven per cent of people in Western Australia identifying as homeless, it’s time to address homelessness in a respectful and relevant way. Grab a drink and tune into Dr Lisa Wood’s talk here.

3.png

10.Viral ideas, writing in the digital age

By Chris Rodley

From ‘listicles’ to memes and daily quizzes, the internet has seen the rise of a host of new ways to express and share ideas. In this talk, hear from academic Chris Rodley traces the origin and rise of these emerging genres that are taking over our collective digital culture. With an emphasis on visual communication, hear how these new forms of media are remixing the way we write and think about the world around us...


Keep the daily inspiration flowing with some easy listening from academics, professors and speakers in Australia and beyond here or stay tuned with our upcoming events by joining our mail list today.


2018.png

Wow, what a year we’ve had!

As 2018 draws the curtains and turns off the lights, we want to thank you all for making it one of the biggest seasons of Raising The Bar. 

We’ve been to five cities this year! From microbiomes in Adelaide to cassava warriors in Perth, thousands of people showed up at local bars to learn from, laugh, and engage with some incredible academics and thought-leaders.

Sydney talked the end of the world. Auckland broke speed records. Melbourne put academics on the line for a karaoke extravaganza. It couldn’t have happened without our amazing partners and of course, all of you. 

As we wish you a happy festive period and safe holidays, we want to journey with you on a recap of RTB 2018…

2018 saw the first RTBADL, as we hit 10 local bars with 20 different speakers. The night covered everything from mental health and wine through to crime and lasers! Huge crowds were treated to selfies with the speakers and beautiful settings for a drink and some knowledge.   Listen to full-length podcasts from your favorite talks here!

2018 saw the first RTBADL, as we hit 10 local bars with 20 different speakers. The night covered everything from mental health and wine through to crime and lasers! Huge crowds were treated to selfies with the speakers and beautiful settings for a drink and some knowledge.

Listen to full-length podcasts from your favorite talks here!

We returned to Auckland for the second year, and heard 20 speakers across 10 bars. The locals got to have a drink in hand whilst learning about Blockchain, Big Brother and travelling at 400km/h!   Listen to those talks and many more podcasts from our Auckland event here!

We returned to Auckland for the second year, and heard 20 speakers across 10 bars. The locals got to have a drink in hand whilst learning about Blockchain, Big Brother and travelling at 400km/h!

Listen to those talks and many more podcasts from our Auckland event here!

Melbourne saw a return of RTB with 22 talks across 7 bars, and had audiences wowed and worried. Data privacy drove some insightful questions from the crowd, and Loop Bar was bursting at the seams with eager RTB’ers.  In a RTB first, Melbourne bore witness to an academic karaoke session which ended with Bijan Shekibi wowing the audience with brain-controlled prosthetics!

Melbourne saw a return of RTB with 22 talks across 7 bars, and had audiences wowed and worried. Data privacy drove some insightful questions from the crowd, and Loop Bar was bursting at the seams with eager RTB’ers.

In a RTB first, Melbourne bore witness to an academic karaoke session which ended with Bijan Shekibi wowing the audience with brain-controlled prosthetics!

RTB loves Sydney, and that was no different for the 2018 edition! Our 4th visit to the Harbour City saw another 20 speakers encite thoughtful reflections on a range of topics, and had #RTBSYD trending on Twitter!  From the paradox of the prison system to the potential ending of our world, Sydney-siders got what they were hoping for on an amazing evening. They heard why generational categories aren’t proven and how we should go about finding happiness!   Listen to the incredible talks from Sydney here!

RTB loves Sydney, and that was no different for the 2018 edition! Our 4th visit to the Harbour City saw another 20 speakers encite thoughtful reflections on a range of topics, and had #RTBSYD trending on Twitter!

From the paradox of the prison system to the potential ending of our world, Sydney-siders got what they were hoping for on an amazing evening. They heard why generational categories aren’t proven and how we should go about finding happiness!

Listen to the incredible talks from Sydney here!

Screen+Shot+2018-12-22+at+4.10.54+PM.jpg
As with all the other RTB 2018 events, Perth was a sold out affair, with 10 amazing talks in 10 bars. The people of Perth heard about cassava warriors, humour and homelessness while the renowned astronomy expert Prof Peter Quinn enlightened a crowd of eager learners on the wonders of the universe.

As with all the other RTB 2018 events, Perth was a sold out affair, with 10 amazing talks in 10 bars. The people of Perth heard about cassava warriors, humour and homelessness while the renowned astronomy expert Prof Peter Quinn enlightened a crowd of eager learners on the wonders of the universe.


Special thanks to our partners who made these wonderful events possible!

edited.jpg
edited.jpg

Screen Shot 2018-12-22 at 4.48.49 PM.png

In 2014, a few New York University and Columbia students had a similar idea. “We wanted to share the knowledge and access to professors we’ve got in New York,” says Inbar Dankner, who was then a business student at NYU. “And we came up with this idea of doing it at local bars.”

They aimed high: their first event was to stage 50 hour-long lectures in 50 bars, all on one night, with topics ranging from neuroscience to music history to philosophy. Neither professor nor bar embraced the idea at first, she says. They had to convince the professors that people would show up and be attentive, and convince bars to close their doors to regular customers for a few hours one evening, with the vague promise that a cadre of new drink-buying customers would stream in.

Neither professor nor bar needed to worry. All 50 venues sold out within 48 hours of the event’s announcement; 5,000 curious drinkers filled the bars around the city that one night. (Tickets were free, but were reserved online in advance.) Afterwards, the organizers were deluged with emails from other universities and students wishing to stage similar events in their cities.

Dankner and others formed a business to organize these, and called it Raising the Bar. They staged a program the next year in San Francisco (with closer to 20 bars), and the next year moved overseas, with events in London, Hong Kong, and Sydney. Australia has been especially keen to expand the program. “In the last year, it’s really exploded,” says Ben Gilden, head of digital and social strategy at Raising the Bar. The crew is currently working with universities in Melbourne and Adelaide on events there, as well as in Auckland, New Zealand. And they’ve twice repeated the New York 50-bar extravaganza.

Raising the Bar’s model calls for universities to pay to underwrite the events, such that tickets for attendees remain free. “It’s a way for universities to engage with their communities in a way they couldn’t before” Gilden says, and move learning out of the classroom and into spaces where people already gather.

The one-hour events also encourage people to sample ideas and concepts that they might ordinarily not be exposed to. Attending doesn’t require a commitment to an entire semester’s run of classes, but offers a low-risk introduction to unfamiliar topics. And you can have a drink or two in the bargain.

Read More

Screen Shot 2018-10-21 at 2.45.04 PM.png

Let's face it — you don't normally expect to walk out of a bar feeling smarter. But global initiative Raising the Bar looks to do just that, pulling education out of classrooms and injecting it into unexpected locations. Hailing from New York, Raising the Bar is heading to Aussie shores, in partnership with the University of Sydney, to take over Sydney bars for one night only.

Ten Sydney haunts — including Della HydeSince I Left YouMojo Record Bar and The Taphouse —are getting involved in this free event, with each venue hosting talks at 6.30pm and 8pm. The bars will be open for business, too, so you can grab a beer to sip on while you try to memorise some new facts to share at parties.

Some of Sydney's brightest minds will come together to discuss their research. And the conversation topics are about as varied as you can get — from heatwaves to happiness to the bioethics of human tissue.

Read more…

We're Hiring!   What: Social Media Coordinator    Location: Remote, Australia-Based

We're Hiring!

What: Social Media Coordinator

Location: Remote, Australia-Based

What we’re looking for:

We’re looking for a rockstar social media coordinator who can take the lead on our social channels and email newsletter campaigns. We need someone who will manage our content calendar on social media, draft and run our email newsletters, and post content during events!

Our ideal candidate has a strong interest in digital marketing, and is hungry to dive into the social media and content space. If you live, eat, and breathe all things social, this is for you!

Responsibilities:

  • Managing content calendar and scheduling posts on our social channels

  • Devising creative ways to help grow digital presence

  • Posting content during Raising the Bar events

  • Drafting and sending email newsletter blasts to our community of tens of thousands of people

  • Responding to inquiries and engaging with RTB community on social

Next steps:
To apply, please send your CV to ben@rtbevent.com with a few sentences about who you are, and why you would be a good fit for the role!

Screen Shot 2018-08-23 at 11.22.57 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-08-23 at 11.19.32 PM.png

What are the most in-demand events in Auckland at the moment? Katy Perry, Rodriguez, Dire Straits?

Try free university lectures.

Yes, tickets to 20 talks by University of Auckland lecturers on August 28 are a hot item. To be fair to the music superstars it is not a legitimate comparison – the lectures are free and they are being held in pubs and bars.

Following the success of last year’s series of Raising the Bar, the university is embarking on a second round of talks by academics who are swapping “tower for town”.

“Last year succeeded beyond our wildest expectations so it was kind of a no-brainer to do it again.” Director of alumni relations and development, Mark Bentley told Newsroom.

With just under two weeks to go, more than half of this year’s talks are sold out and the others are filling up. Read More. 

 

Raising the Bar: Like a Ted Talk, but with alcohol

Screen Shot 2018-08-23 at 11.15.42 PM.png

It might not be how you normally hit the pub with mates, but it'll guarantee the chat will be better. 

Auckland University is bringing back Raising the Bar for its second year running: a worldwide initiative to bring knowledge to the city's nightlife.

Twenty talks from different experts take place across 10 bars on one night - August 28.

Such topics include 'Race and Queerness in Bounce music' at Little Easy on Ponsonby Rd, 'Big Brother is Everywhere' at Snickel Lane on Customs Street or 'Apples, Ancestors and Rock Hard Evidence' at Sweat Shop Brew Kitchen on Sale Street.

Read More..

PLEASURE TO MEET YOU, ADELAIDE!

We are excited to announce that we're partnering with the City of Norwood Payneham & St Peters to launch the first Raising the Bar Adelaide event!

On Tuesday, 7 August 2018 we'll be hosting 20 talks at 10 local Adelaide bars on everything from mental health to wine to criminals & and even lasers!

We have an amazing line-up of speakers including world-renowned professors, economists, marketers, surgeons & more, so it is sure to be a night you won't soon forget! 

Screen Shot 2018-01-06 at 4.58.37 PM.png

Once upon a time, a night out on the town meant drinking and dancing.

But knock-off drinks had a different feel when Raising the Bar took over 10 venues in Melbourne city, hosting 20 talks from academics and experts.

The event was conceived in New York, but spread to Melbourne last year, where a booked-out program ensured a repeat appearance.

The topics range from arts and culture, to science and technology, sociology and philosophy.

And while the subjects may seem dry, another sell-out night suggests there is a strong thirst for learning.

Screen Shot 2018-01-06 at 5.00.58 PM.png

Jacinta Young and Steve Taitoko were ready to settle in for a long evening of discussion about topics from legal storytelling to cryptocurrency.

Mr Taitoko is clear on the appeal.

"I mean it's like TED talks in bars, I think that's becoming more of a way that people can engage and again it's about telling stories so you want something that's quite informal," he said.

Ms Young agreed.

"It's a relaxed atmosphere, it's different to a seminar where you might go and sit in an auditorium," she said.

Lucy Plisko and Tassie Williams also aimed for a big night out with academics and experts, signing up for three separate sessions.

Considering university students spend thousands on their education, only to sleep through their lectures, the pair pondered the popularity of informal learning after a full day of work.

Screen Shot 2018-01-06 at 5.02.39 PM.png

"So I think the engagement is higher when people have chosen to come."

Ms Plisko agreed.

"It's a good way of seeing Melbourne, the city as well. We hadn't been to any of these bars before, so it's a good reason to come back for a bite to eat," she said.

Screen Shot 2018-01-06 at 5.04.45 PM.png

How to pick the Raising the Bar talk that’s right for you

Screen Shot 2018-01-06 at 4.52.48 PM.png

Have a taste of what is on offer

Raising the Bar Sydney is back for another round. If you need a refresher, Raising the Bar sees the University of Sydney take education out of the lecture theatre and into bars across Sydney. 

This year you can enjoy two talks in one night; with  academics delivering 20 talks across 10 bars in two different sessions – one at 6.30pm and another at 8pm.

That’s a lot of choices! Which is why we have put together a taste test of bars and talks that nicely compliment each other, so you can sample before you decide. 

Read more

RAISING THE BAR SYDNEY2017

Unlearn what you think you know as fact at these fascinating, free bar talks.

For one night only, Raising the Bar brings the classroom to the bar to encourage people to unlearn the old and to explore ideas consolidated by new research. In 10 bars across Sydney, 20 academics from the University of Sydney will delve into topics as diverse as body clocks, gambling, refugees, Taylor Swift and the Mediterranean diet.

The hugely-popular pub talks are held yearly in New York, Hong Kong, London and, for the third year running, Sydney. Raising the Bar was initiated by scholars from Columbia and New York Universities with the underlying aim of introducing newly discovered research to the public, in a non-academic environment.

Topics this year include a discussion on the usefulness of FitBits, a plunge into the link between Internet memes and US politics, and an exploration of the possibilities of using robots to help us deal with social and environmental change.

Check the website to book your free ticket and further info on all talks. But get in soon — these talks will fill up super fast.

RAISING THE BAR AUCKLAND

We think it's safe to say that the first ever #RTBAKL event was absolutely incredible tonight! Thank you to everyone that came out to the talks to learn and socialize, and to our amazing speakers for sharing their wealth of knowledge.

University of Auckland takes lectures to the pub, following international trend

SHANI WILLIAMS

Last updated 15:14, July 24 2017

1500928181832.jpg

Auckland academics are ditching the lecture theatre for the city's bars.

The University of Auckland will send 20 academics to lecture at 10 Auckland bars as a part of a worldwide initiative next month.

The event, called "Raising the Bar", aims to make education a greater part of the city's culture by giving the community the chance to engage with leading academics in a friendly, accessible and laid back atmosphere.

The initiative originated in New York in 2015 and is designed to break down the perception that higher education deepens socioeconomic inequality by pushing away prospective students.

Raising the Bar quickly spread to Melbourne, Sydney, San Francisco, London, Hong Kong and now Auckland.

University of Auckland director of alumni relations and development Mark Bentley said the lecture topics would reflect the younger "Ted Talk generation".

The sessions, being held on August 29, would be fascinating, quick and informative, he said. 

Read more

Raising the Bar: Sharks and the brain

What sharks can teach us about our brains

eight_col_43454392_m.jpg

The human cerebellum occupies 10% of brain volume, but has nearly 80% of the nerve cells! What does our cerebellum do? Why does it need so many nerve cells? The answer may lie in the brains of sharks.

Our cerebellum evolved from these cerebellum-like structures in these magnificent beasts, yet sharks can use theirs for amazing things. For example, they can detect weak bioelectric fields from prey whilst distinguishing from their own.

Join Professor John Montgomery as he draws the link between the brains of sharks and the human mind. Read More.

 
 

Some of University of Auckland’s finest academics are leaving the “ivory tower” and heading to the pubs in Ponsonby ... and a few other places around town.

Auckland is joining a growing list of international universities that have decided to mix education with popular culture (drinking).

On August 29, 20 leading academics will give talks in 10 Auckland bars. The topics range from the ethics of drone strikes to how pop songs are created.

The idea of turning bars into mini “think tanks” for a night came from a group of New York students.

RAISING THE BAR (RTB) spread from New York to San Francisco, London, Sydney, Melbourne and Hong Kong. University of Auckland picked up on the idea while holding a function for its alumni in New York.

Director of Alumni relations and development, Mark Bentley, says: "We are always looking for ways to engage with our alumni, and the younger ones are harder to reach.

Read More...

Nice to meet you, New Zealand!

Raise Your Glass to Knowledge


Auckland is the latest city to join a worldwide initiative to transform bars into lecture theatres.

The University of Auckland is hosting a Raising the Bar event on August 29, when leading academics will give 20 free talks at 10 inner-city Auckland bars on one night.

With topics ranging from why terrorists want to kill us, getting up in space, to life among the robots, Aucklanders with a thirst for knowledge will be spoilt for choice.

The concept for Raising the Bar originated in New York, with the aim of making education a greater part of a city’s popular culture. It has since expanded to major cities around the world including San Francisco, Hong Kong, Sydney, London, and Melbourne.

For the inaugural Auckland event the University has collaborated with bars in close proximity to one another so attendees may be able to visit up to two venues on the night.

Read more...